Question: What Are The Signs And Symptoms Of Polycythemia?

What happens if Polycythemia is not treated?

The clots may cause serious problems, such as stroke, heart attack, deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

Blood clots occur in about 30 percent of patients even before the PV diagnosis is made.

During the first 10 years after a diagnosis of PV, 40 to 60 percent of untreated PV patients may develop blood clots..

How often does polycythemia vera turn into leukemia?

Polycythemia vera transforms to acute leukemia (blast phase) 10 years after diagnosis in about 10% of cases. Patients who progress to the blast phase respond to treatment poorly and have a median survival of only 3 to 6 months after the start of the blast phase.

Can polycythemia go away?

There’s no cure for polycythemia vera. Treatment focuses on reducing your risk of complications. These treatments may also ease your symptoms.

Can you live a long life with polycythemia vera?

Polycythemia Vera: Prognosis and Life Expectancy. Polycythemia vera (PV) is a rare blood cancer. While no cure exists for PV, it can be controlled through treatment, and you can live with the disease for many years.

Will polycythemia vera kill me?

Many people with polycythemia vera (PV) live a normal life with this rare blood cancer under control. The goal is to avoid complications like blood clots, which may happen because PV thickens your blood.

Does polycythemia get worse?

It usually happens during the later stages of the disease. Polycythemia vera treatments help reduce your risk of symptoms and complications. But for some people, the disease still gets worse and turns into another blood cancer, despite treatment.

What foods to avoid if you have polycythemia?

I already knew before researching what foods I should avoid: sugar, carbohydrates, fast and processed foods.

Does polycythemia run in families?

Most cases of polycythemia vera are not inherited. This condition is associated with genetic changes that are somatic, which means they are acquired during a person’s lifetime and are present only in certain cells. In rare instances, polycythemia vera has been found to run in families.

How serious is PV?

If it’s not treated, PV can lead to life-threatening complications. Blood that flows more slowly can reduce the amount of oxygen that reaches your heart, brain, and other vital organs. And blood clots can completely block blood flow within a blood vessel, causing a stroke or even death.

How do you know if you have polycythemia?

The signs and symptoms of PV include: Headaches, dizziness, and weakness. Shortness of breath and problems breathing while lying down. Feelings of pressure or fullness on the left side of the abdomen due to an enlarged spleen (an organ in the abdomen)

What are the two types of polycythemia?

There are 2 main types: primary polycythaemia – there’s a problem in the cells produced by the bone marrow that become red blood cells; the most common type is known as polycythaemia vera (PV) secondary polycythaemia – too many red blood cells are produced as the result of an underlying condition.

What is the difference between polycythemia and polycythemia vera?

Absolute polycythemia occurs when more RBCs are produced than normal and their count is truly elevated. Dehydration is a common cause of relative polycythemia. Absolute polycythemia may be primary or secondary. Primary polycythemia (polycythemia vera) is a spontaneous proliferation of RBCs in the bone marrow.

Is Polycythemia a disability?

If you suffer from polycythemia vera, which is a serious disease that can result in death, you may be unable to work. In those situations, you may qualify for Social Security disability benefits.

What causes polycythemia?

Polycythemia can be linked to secondary causes, such as, chronic hypoxia or tumors releasing erythropoietin. Abnormally increased red cell production in the bone marrow causes polycythemia vera.

What is the life expectancy of someone with polycythemia vera?

Median survival in patients with polycythemia vera (PV), which is 1.5-3 years in the absence of therapy, has been extended to approximately 14 years overall, and to 24 years for patients younger than 60 years of age, because of new therapeutic tools.